Not Blue in Blue In Maldives

Moving house and internet being cut off (because our Indian visas expired – despite having new ones) has delayed this blog significantly – please enjoy. 

A certain degree of sympathy is required of you, my dear reader. I need you to empathise with me and feel my pain. I need you to imagine you are with me and to stroke my pain and make it all go away. Not only am I sat in Male Airport (early as always): leaving the heaven that is the Maldives; not only am I sat on a hard uncomfortable seat; not only am I sat in what can only be described as terrible air conditioning; but I am sat on two sunburnt bum cheeks! See! Understand now why I need your sympathy? I sit here with the equivalent of a toaster underneath my bum and it hurts!

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Motorway to / from the airport! Better than the M25 any day!
More about my bum later. Well at least for you, for me we are unfortunately going to have to co-exist for just a little bit longer.

On the plus side, I have just had the most incredible ten days of my life on the stunningly beautiful island of Hembadhu in the Maldives.

Wait though, first the exciting news! No, wait first two exciting pieces of news! Are you ready?

Diving, Breathing and Fatigue!

I have fallen in love! Yes, Chris is still loved, don’t worry about that but I fell head over heels with diving at first breath! Wow! Impulse and nothing more led me to try a PADI Discover Scuba Diving – just two hours. This turned into a Padi Scuba Diver course which turned into a Padi Open Water Scuba Diver course which turned into a Padi Adventure Diver course. Totally unplanned and totally unpredictable!

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So I said I had two pieces of exciting news. Well, perhaps not two individual pieces perhaps it is best described as two conjoined pieces of exciting news! So what is it? Much to my complete surprise and thank god because after that first breath I really hoped there was no going back on diving, I could breathe so much easier underwater and it would seem after 9 dives – no fatigue issues!

For those reading this blog for the first time, you will not be aware that after a rather serious illness I have been left (hopefully not permanently) with reasonably serious breathing and fatigue issues unless both are rather carefully managed. You would never know upon meeting me that this was going on but it is.

Seriously, an hour’s diving burns roughly 350 calories; now the equivalent of that would be say a five mile walk. Let’s be clear there would be no problem in me walking five miles, can do it relatively easily, could even manage a ten mile walk with a break in the middle although by the end I would probably be utterly exhausted.  But could I really manage it day after day while doing lots of theory study in between? Not a chance! It felt miraculous.

Even if I felt a little tired before diving, the fatigue vanished as soon as I went underwater. Not only did it vanish but it didn’t return after. The first few dives, I dismissed it as purely the adrenalin effect and kept in the back of my mind the danger of living in an adrenalin bubble. But no, diving seems to be genuinely therapeutic for both my breathing and my fatigue levels.

The guys from the dive school, I don’t think quite got just how miraculous this felt to me. How incredible that I can do a sport and it didn’t utterly exhaust me, it didn’t cause any muscle pain or leave me struggling to walk or simply keep going. This situation is relatively rare these days, perhaps once every six weeks or so but with the amount of exercise I have gotten over the last ten days, it should have been guaranteed!

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Will and Rusty from Blue In Maldives

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As you can see diving makes me just look like a supermodel!
A perfect example would be when on our holiday, I mismanaged my energy levels by getting up early for a morning dive and then doing a night dive. By the time I sat for dinner at about 9p.m., I was exhausted. On the way back to our villa, I had one of my energy collapses.

 

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The scene of my epic emotional battle: ‘To Dive or Not to Dive. That is the question!’

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Everyone happily getting on with their tasks, while I tried to convince myself I was a fool to dive! I was wrong!
 

 

 

Rising the next morning for another morning dive, I was truly exhausted and in a lot of pain. This was however my last chance to dive before we left the Maldives and my last chance to complete my Adventure Diver certification. Getting on the boat, I was completely out of it. My brain was telling me that I would be a fool to dive, my heart was telling me go for it!! Only teetering on the edge of the boat in my full diving gear, did I finally make the decision to dive.

Within minutes the pain and exhaustion had disappeared and 40 minutes later I came to the surface fully re-energised. I even went on to do a second dive! Even more miraculously, there were no side effects – the pain and fatigue remained gone. I reached the decision that my mistake was not to do two dives in a day but rather to reduce my sleep time by rising early and then going to bed late – this was my mistake.

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Rusty, the crazy South African
What can I say? I truly believe it is the first time in my life where I have tried something and simply adored it from the get go! Helped of course by the amazing guys (and Pip) from Blue In Maldives: the dive school based on the island. What a great bunch of relaxed, laid back but incredible teachers they are. Have to give a big shout out to Rusty, a crazy South African but one so enthusiastic about his sport that even the most stubborn couldn’t help but fall for diving.

My only quibble with recommending Rusty however is his seeming inability to point out turtles – 8 dives it took before I saw one – 8 dives!! Every day, everyone was talking about these amazing turtles, ‘wow, it sat on me!’ etc etc and I am just stood there saying – “no, didn’t see any again!!”

I could spend time trying to explain to you how wow it was – but let’s let these pictures do the talking. Pictures were taken by William Erazo Fernandez: an Costa Rican instructor at Blue In Maldives – the dive centre at the Taj Vivanta.  An amazingly fun guy: passionate about diving but you can also see with a real passion and talent for photography.

You see, I have a problem and they say the first step to solving a problem is admitting it – so here it goes – ‘I adore diving!’ Now that isn’t an obvious problem, is it? Well it is when you are 10 days on an island with nothing more to do than read and snorkel. Still not spotting the problem? Well, let me explain. You see when you find something to do that is addictive, its always best if for example it is something like walking: buy some good boots and a raincoat and off you go. Diving on the other hand is not cheap. It’s definitely value for money but it still takes a lot of money out of your bank account! So, when one course led to another – my bank account became increasingly empty! Was it worth it? Fill my bank account with cash and watch me do it again!!

The last course I completed was an Adventure Diver course. Yes, me – Karen – is an Adventure Diver! Could you have ever guessed?

This course consisted of a Deep Dive – this now allows me to dive to depths of about 30m. To be honest the deep dive didn’t feel any different from the other dives, just well – deeper. The main benefit being that you are able to see things that are not higher up! Like for example the Housereef Wreck – at 18m, I could see a fair bit of it but as a deep diver I could see it all.

My second adventure dive was a Drift Dive! Yip, you hop into current and allow it to pull you along. Definitely, a little unnerving but great fun. Our first attempt at drift diving saw us jump into quite a large swell for a girl who had only boat dived once before. I was really nervous! What would happen if I jumped in and then whoosh the current dragged me away from everyone else and I was left all alone. With my heart thumping, I jumped in and descended immediately – to what? To peaceful, calm waters!

What?? Given the inability to hold a full conversation underwater, I spent the dive just a little disappointed with this drift diving business. I mean it was stunningly beautiful but where was this current threatening to whisk me away? Where? Nowhere, that’s where. Turns out, we had drift dived in a place that had no current that day. Instead we went deep diving.

The next day was attempt two at drift diving. This time, I was super chilled. The sea was like a mill pond, not a ripple in sight. Gathering on the surface, we all descended together to a current! Whoa! Didn’t expect that! A reasonably serious current for a novice drift diver. It was unnerving, the only way to stop moving was to hold onto a rock on the bottom. I failed to stick with Rusty as much as I should have done. I did try but I kept being moved on. His rather greater experience however ensured that he was never far away, although I think he found me a little exasperating on that dive.

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The spectacular coral from our drift dive, no wonder I got distracted and lost Rusty (sort of)!
This of course was the dive that anyone who has heard me talk about my diving experience has heard the story about! There we were, finally checking out this really cool turtle, with me hanging on to a tiny piece of rock, when low and behold he starts swimming towards me. I’m clinging onto this little bit of rock thinking, ‘What do I do? What do I do???’ He gets closer and closer until I’m staring into his eyes and me into his. I’d love to describe this has an underwater ‘pastoral scene, the essence of Victorian writing but no.

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More me doing more of the, ‘What do I do? What do I do???’ Mixed in with a little, ‘Good god, you are beautiful’. So I’m faced with the decision, let go and drift away from the group but by this ensuring that the turtle can move wherever he wishes or hold on and who knows what will happen!

I held on! What did he do? He swam right over my head, hitting my forehead with his back fin as he passed! Seriously, without doubt one of the coolest moments in my entire life. I will never forget this, ever!

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This blog finishes with my having returned to India (where it is super serious hot!). I have not only checked out a local scuba diving group but I’ve even been scuba diving in a local diving pool. Now, it ain’t no Maldives but it will do until I get a chance to dive properly again. Not only that, it doesn’t seem I got typhoid or any serious skin ailments from the pool – so that’s great news. 

 Finkick is a great bunch of people who try and travel a least once every couple of months to diving spots around India but mainly around Asia. I wish I could afford to go all the time but I will definitely be joining them as often as the bank account allows! 

All donations welcome!

Have you ever dived? If so, where and what did you think of it? 

If not, would you like to? Why?

In case you would like to see more underwater pictures – here you go!

 

6 thoughts on “Not Blue in Blue In Maldives”

  1. Delighted for you. When researching your ailments rem one of the many suggested cures was time in those baric chambers used for recovering from the bends. I wondered alright about your breathing. The oxygen may have also helped.
    Waiting for our taxi in the rain. Hope venice is at least drier.
    Mum

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    1. That’s what I’m thinking. Plus the oxygen is compressed and my body is under pressure the deeper I go. It was very strange but after 9 dives I am certain it wasn’t just an adrenalin rush because that definitely would have come and bitten me if it was!!

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      1. I was also thinking on another explanation: as the body becomes lighter when immersed in water it would require less energy to move… (thus the hydrotherapy for ppl with different types of disabilities). Anyway, this great experience of yours suggests possibilities of treatment for CFS, AF, fibromyalgia, and who knows which other conditions !

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      2. My (adoptive) daughter also has cerebral palsy – she was prescribed hydrotherapy as well, however she had very low immunity and was sick all the time with throat infection (long time in water) – eventually we had to give it up. She was only about 2-3 years old, then; now she is much stronger, at 21. Your friend will certainly benefit from the experience, and I wish her good results. XX

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