Category Archives: Breathing

Not Blue in Blue In Maldives

Moving house and internet being cut off (because our Indian visas expired – despite having new ones) has delayed this blog significantly – please enjoy. 

A certain degree of sympathy is required of you, my dear reader. I need you to empathise with me and feel my pain. I need you to imagine you are with me and to stroke my pain and make it all go away. Not only am I sat in Male Airport (early as always): leaving the heaven that is the Maldives; not only am I sat on a hard uncomfortable seat; not only am I sat in what can only be described as terrible air conditioning; but I am sat on two sunburnt bum cheeks! See! Understand now why I need your sympathy? I sit here with the equivalent of a toaster underneath my bum and it hurts!

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Motorway to / from the airport! Better than the M25 any day!
More about my bum later. Well at least for you, for me we are unfortunately going to have to co-exist for just a little bit longer.

On the plus side, I have just had the most incredible ten days of my life on the stunningly beautiful island of Hembadhu in the Maldives.

Wait though, first the exciting news! No, wait first two exciting pieces of news! Are you ready?

Diving, Breathing and Fatigue!

I have fallen in love! Yes, Chris is still loved, don’t worry about that but I fell head over heels with diving at first breath! Wow! Impulse and nothing more led me to try a PADI Discover Scuba Diving – just two hours. This turned into a Padi Scuba Diver course which turned into a Padi Open Water Scuba Diver course which turned into a Padi Adventure Diver course. Totally unplanned and totally unpredictable!

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So I said I had two pieces of exciting news. Well, perhaps not two individual pieces perhaps it is best described as two conjoined pieces of exciting news! So what is it? Much to my complete surprise and thank god because after that first breath I really hoped there was no going back on diving, I could breathe so much easier underwater and it would seem after 9 dives – no fatigue issues!

For those reading this blog for the first time, you will not be aware that after a rather serious illness I have been left (hopefully not permanently) with reasonably serious breathing and fatigue issues unless both are rather carefully managed. You would never know upon meeting me that this was going on but it is.

Seriously, an hour’s diving burns roughly 350 calories; now the equivalent of that would be say a five mile walk. Let’s be clear there would be no problem in me walking five miles, can do it relatively easily, could even manage a ten mile walk with a break in the middle although by the end I would probably be utterly exhausted.  But could I really manage it day after day while doing lots of theory study in between? Not a chance! It felt miraculous.

Even if I felt a little tired before diving, the fatigue vanished as soon as I went underwater. Not only did it vanish but it didn’t return after. The first few dives, I dismissed it as purely the adrenalin effect and kept in the back of my mind the danger of living in an adrenalin bubble. But no, diving seems to be genuinely therapeutic for both my breathing and my fatigue levels.

The guys from the dive school, I don’t think quite got just how miraculous this felt to me. How incredible that I can do a sport and it didn’t utterly exhaust me, it didn’t cause any muscle pain or leave me struggling to walk or simply keep going. This situation is relatively rare these days, perhaps once every six weeks or so but with the amount of exercise I have gotten over the last ten days, it should have been guaranteed!

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Will and Rusty from Blue In Maldives

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As you can see diving makes me just look like a supermodel!
A perfect example would be when on our holiday, I mismanaged my energy levels by getting up early for a morning dive and then doing a night dive. By the time I sat for dinner at about 9p.m., I was exhausted. On the way back to our villa, I had one of my energy collapses.

 

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The scene of my epic emotional battle: ‘To Dive or Not to Dive. That is the question!’

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Everyone happily getting on with their tasks, while I tried to convince myself I was a fool to dive! I was wrong!
 

 

 

Rising the next morning for another morning dive, I was truly exhausted and in a lot of pain. This was however my last chance to dive before we left the Maldives and my last chance to complete my Adventure Diver certification. Getting on the boat, I was completely out of it. My brain was telling me that I would be a fool to dive, my heart was telling me go for it!! Only teetering on the edge of the boat in my full diving gear, did I finally make the decision to dive.

Within minutes the pain and exhaustion had disappeared and 40 minutes later I came to the surface fully re-energised. I even went on to do a second dive! Even more miraculously, there were no side effects – the pain and fatigue remained gone. I reached the decision that my mistake was not to do two dives in a day but rather to reduce my sleep time by rising early and then going to bed late – this was my mistake.

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Rusty, the crazy South African
What can I say? I truly believe it is the first time in my life where I have tried something and simply adored it from the get go! Helped of course by the amazing guys (and Pip) from Blue In Maldives: the dive school based on the island. What a great bunch of relaxed, laid back but incredible teachers they are. Have to give a big shout out to Rusty, a crazy South African but one so enthusiastic about his sport that even the most stubborn couldn’t help but fall for diving.

My only quibble with recommending Rusty however is his seeming inability to point out turtles – 8 dives it took before I saw one – 8 dives!! Every day, everyone was talking about these amazing turtles, ‘wow, it sat on me!’ etc etc and I am just stood there saying – “no, didn’t see any again!!”

I could spend time trying to explain to you how wow it was – but let’s let these pictures do the talking. Pictures were taken by William Erazo Fernandez: an Costa Rican instructor at Blue In Maldives – the dive centre at the Taj Vivanta.  An amazingly fun guy: passionate about diving but you can also see with a real passion and talent for photography.

You see, I have a problem and they say the first step to solving a problem is admitting it – so here it goes – ‘I adore diving!’ Now that isn’t an obvious problem, is it? Well it is when you are 10 days on an island with nothing more to do than read and snorkel. Still not spotting the problem? Well, let me explain. You see when you find something to do that is addictive, its always best if for example it is something like walking: buy some good boots and a raincoat and off you go. Diving on the other hand is not cheap. It’s definitely value for money but it still takes a lot of money out of your bank account! So, when one course led to another – my bank account became increasingly empty! Was it worth it? Fill my bank account with cash and watch me do it again!!

The last course I completed was an Adventure Diver course. Yes, me – Karen – is an Adventure Diver! Could you have ever guessed?

This course consisted of a Deep Dive – this now allows me to dive to depths of about 30m. To be honest the deep dive didn’t feel any different from the other dives, just well – deeper. The main benefit being that you are able to see things that are not higher up! Like for example the Housereef Wreck – at 18m, I could see a fair bit of it but as a deep diver I could see it all.

My second adventure dive was a Drift Dive! Yip, you hop into current and allow it to pull you along. Definitely, a little unnerving but great fun. Our first attempt at drift diving saw us jump into quite a large swell for a girl who had only boat dived once before. I was really nervous! What would happen if I jumped in and then whoosh the current dragged me away from everyone else and I was left all alone. With my heart thumping, I jumped in and descended immediately – to what? To peaceful, calm waters!

What?? Given the inability to hold a full conversation underwater, I spent the dive just a little disappointed with this drift diving business. I mean it was stunningly beautiful but where was this current threatening to whisk me away? Where? Nowhere, that’s where. Turns out, we had drift dived in a place that had no current that day. Instead we went deep diving.

The next day was attempt two at drift diving. This time, I was super chilled. The sea was like a mill pond, not a ripple in sight. Gathering on the surface, we all descended together to a current! Whoa! Didn’t expect that! A reasonably serious current for a novice drift diver. It was unnerving, the only way to stop moving was to hold onto a rock on the bottom. I failed to stick with Rusty as much as I should have done. I did try but I kept being moved on. His rather greater experience however ensured that he was never far away, although I think he found me a little exasperating on that dive.

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The spectacular coral from our drift dive, no wonder I got distracted and lost Rusty (sort of)!
This of course was the dive that anyone who has heard me talk about my diving experience has heard the story about! There we were, finally checking out this really cool turtle, with me hanging on to a tiny piece of rock, when low and behold he starts swimming towards me. I’m clinging onto this little bit of rock thinking, ‘What do I do? What do I do???’ He gets closer and closer until I’m staring into his eyes and me into his. I’d love to describe this has an underwater ‘pastoral scene, the essence of Victorian writing but no.

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More me doing more of the, ‘What do I do? What do I do???’ Mixed in with a little, ‘Good god, you are beautiful’. So I’m faced with the decision, let go and drift away from the group but by this ensuring that the turtle can move wherever he wishes or hold on and who knows what will happen!

I held on! What did he do? He swam right over my head, hitting my forehead with his back fin as he passed! Seriously, without doubt one of the coolest moments in my entire life. I will never forget this, ever!

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This blog finishes with my having returned to India (where it is super serious hot!). I have not only checked out a local scuba diving group but I’ve even been scuba diving in a local diving pool. Now, it ain’t no Maldives but it will do until I get a chance to dive properly again. Not only that, it doesn’t seem I got typhoid or any serious skin ailments from the pool – so that’s great news. 

 Finkick is a great bunch of people who try and travel a least once every couple of months to diving spots around India but mainly around Asia. I wish I could afford to go all the time but I will definitely be joining them as often as the bank account allows! 

All donations welcome!

Have you ever dived? If so, where and what did you think of it? 

If not, would you like to? Why?

In case you would like to see more underwater pictures – here you go!

 

I Don’t Think I’m Ready But Perhaps I Should Anyhow

This blog was first written about 18 months ago. I was too embarrassed to post it – too embarrassed to admit I wasn’t strong enough to cope. Since then, I regularly come across it, read it and instead of thinking why was I such an idiot about the whole thing? Why was I too embarrassed to post it? I continue to feel embarrassed – its ridiculous! 

So I have decided to be brave and post this blog. It is well out of date but I don’t think it matters. Perhaps somebody who is having a similar psychological fight as I had will read it and feel that they are not alone. Maybe they will see the ridiculousness in not talking about it and actually speak to somebody! 

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I’m doing something that only one person vaguely knows about – at least they are slightly aware of its existence but they don’t actually know I have started to use it. Not even my husband knows about its existence, never mind the fact that I actually have started to use it. This goes against everything that I have tried to maintain since I first got ill. Since I first got ill, I have always said that being open about what was going on, in particular with my husband, was absolutely key. Not being open might lead to distrust and misunderstandings. I have always argued that it was wrong to do anything that might encourage that feeling.

So what am I doing that is so awful I can’t even tell my husband? What is it that I am feeling so unsure of, perhaps even so stupid for doing it that I can’t tell my husband? I do not understand what makes me feel so embarrassed, I do not understand why I don’t want to share what I am doing with anyone. So what am I doing?

While we were on holidays and I had a relapse, one day we walked back from the restaurant and I clung to my husband’s arm, desperate for his support and to help me balance. It dawned on me that day that if I could find something that would help me maintain my energy levels and support me when I was having a bad day, then that surely would be a good thing.

So what have I invested in? I have invested in a walking stick.

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And look just how fun it is! And its my favourite colour!

The fact that it took me three paragraphs to get to the point says it all. I am not sure I am ready to use a walking stick, walking sticks are for old people or invalids – I am not old and I do not feel like an invalid therefore surely that means I do not need one. I am embarrassed at the thought of using it and I am embarrassed at the thought of being seen with it. Does using one mean I have given in – once again – to this illness?

You could, very rightly, argue that if I am using it to walk further on a bad day then it is assisting me in doing more than I should. If I could exercise myself better then yes, using it on a bad day would surely little by little assist me in improving my health. I cannot however exercise myself better so surely anything that enables me to do more is just increasing the intensity of my exercise? I think I am just looking for excuses as to why I shouldn’t use it, rather than looking for justifiable reasons why I should.

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True for so much of my illness, definitely not true in this case. Being too embarrassed to discuss my need for a walking stick preventing me using it. This was not me being strong but me being a coward. 

It has only been used twice, having owned it for more than a week I bought a folding one so I could have it in my bag to use should I be out and suddenly get an unexpected collapse of energy. I have   carried it around for a week every time I went out to use in just those circumstances. On Saturday when we walked across a field to get to a nuclear bunker (don’t ask), I was finding the surface hard going and thought just how much my walking stick might help me. There it was just waiting for me in my bag on my back. We were with friends however and I was embarrassed. Embarrassed because my husband had no idea I had it and embarrassed because then my friends might look at me as sick girl. I seriously overdid it on Saturday and as a consequence paid the price on Sunday.

20140318-080008.jpgIf I had used my walking stick for the entire duration of our outing, would I have overdone it so much? Would it have enabled me to use less energy by providing me with support, balance and indeed a method of propulsion. Perhaps, but I was too scared and embarrassed to try it.

This got me thinking. If I was able to reduce my energy requirements on an everyday basis by use of my walking stick, would this enable me to live more of a life? Walk further, do more? Would this be a good thing? Would this just encourage me to do more than I should? However, if I am using the same amount of energy but using it to do more surely that is a good thing? Again am I just looking for reasons to justify not using it and looking for reasons to prove my justification is ever so wrong. Perhaps the latter but I really do not know.

On Monday, still not quite having recovered from my overdoing it on Saturday, I went for a walk. A walk that included my walking stick. I deliberately kept to the back roads embarrassed by my stick. Ashamed to be seen out with it. At least this was my initial feeling. My walk to my usual churchyard seat took no longer than 6 minutes.  By the time I arrived, I was beginning to get the feeling that it was helping me. I should have been more tired by the walk given my energy levels. My legs should have begun to feel more pain but they were no worse than when I left. Was this the benefit of the walking stick or was it simply that I had under-estimated my energy levels and over-estimated my pain levels?

On my return, I walked back a different route, a route that touched the sides of busy roads, a road where there were pedestrians: people to see me and possibly make comments and wonder why a girl in her mid 30s was using a walking stick. I was very aware of everyone who passed, straining to hear them comment amongst themselves about me. Perhaps I was lucky or perhaps people just didn’t notice or care but I did not hear what I strained for. Silence.

Today Tuesday, the next day, I have tried again. This time walking further than yesterday. Again I didn’t struggle or feel my energy diminishing too quickly. This time I was aware as I crossed rocky ground that it was given me support and helping me balance. With my walking stick it was easier than it would have been without!

20140429-094815.jpgI am still a walking stick virgin however. I still hold it wrong at times and have to adjust it. I dropped it crossing the road until I remember to twist its string around my wrist so it wouldn’t fall. At times I don’t quite get the propulsion right and it lands on the ground at an odd angle. I haven’t learnt how to balance it when I sit down. I also haven’t learnt how to accept that it might be useful to me.

 

How can a walking stick be useful to a girl in her mid 30s who can walk for just over a mile (with a break half way)? How can a walking stick be useful to a girl in her mid 30s who doesn’t walk with a limp or need to balance against things? That is unless I am having a bad day.

For me using a walking stick is still a big experiment. Will I continue to use it? I don’t know – I hope I will if it consistently helps me. Will I tell my husband? I guess I have to. What will he think? I don’t know but I know he will at least wear a mask of support. I think he will think that if I am finding it useful then it is a great thing to do. I wonder whether he will find it embarrassing to be seen with me? Could I blame him if he didn’t? Hardly, I am not exactly embarrassment free at all of this, now am I?

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Gillian above (with her own walking stick) – my inspiration while I was sick and a never-ending source of support. She would have given me a right telling off if she had known I had a stick and wasn’t using it!

My friend, Gillian, was the first and only person I have ever discussed using a walking stick with. She uses one herself and even offered to lend me one of hers to try it out. I was embarrassed by the conversation – I think perhaps by the very need to have it in the first place. She was supportive and encouraging. She too was young and understood what it felt like to start to use one – she had started to use hers at 18! Her encouragement enabled me to at least buy one. I would like to think that one day I will be as brave as her and see only the positive reasons for using a walking stick. The negative reasons are surely just a matter of perception.

So I did eventually tell my husband who completely unsurprisingly was utterly supportive of me! 

I didn’t use it all the time but I always had it on me ready to pull out when things got difficult and I used it all day on a bad day. A walking stick categorically helped me! A month or so after I started to use it, I was re-diagnosed and given treatment that enabled me to make rapid improvement – very quickly after this the walking stick was no longer required. 

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In hindsight, I can only wonder why I made such a big deal about using one! Nobody looked at me funny, nobody laughed and in truth I don’t think any strangers actually cared. I should have used the inspiration of Gillian more – she is a girl who just gets on with things and doesn’t allow fear or worry stop her. Perhaps although I am now living in India and while not healthy, a lot healthier, this blog should act as a reminder that sometimes to be strong you need to accept your weaknesses and not let them hold you back.

Unbridled Expectations

One cannot understand anything unless one is determined and indeed wants to understand. It is easy to put on the blinkers and only look in the one direction you want to. For months that one direction was denial. Denial that I was ill, denial that I had to accept the limitations that this illness put on both my body and life.

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There were times when I eased the blinkers off slightly, looked around in fragile acceptance before quickly jamming them back on and once again refusing to look in any direction other than that where it appeared I was in full health.

Over time the clasps on the blinkers aged and all it took was a gentle knock before they fell away revealing my true situation. I was very ill and I had to accept all the limitations this illness placed on me or I would never get better. Refusing / being unable to accept this for so long had had a detrimental impact on my health. Being able to accept this enabled me to stabilise and then to begin to make very slow progress.

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As regular readers will know, early September I was rediagnosed and given a new treatment plan all connected to breathing correctly. The change in my health was exceedingly rapid. The true joy came not in my improving health but the corresponding improvement in my lifestyle. No longer did i have to seriously limit time spent with friends, no longer could I only walk down the road and back, no longer did I experience the debilitating pain I had dealt with for 9 months. Once again I felt free and invincible.

Invincibility however does not prevent the acquisition of new blinkers, stronger ones that won’t age and fall away so easily. Where previously the blinkers had prevented me from seeing just how ill I was, these new blinkers prevented me from realising that I am not super woman: there is a limit to what I am able to achieve.

I was so determined to relish my new-found freedom that I forgot the basic fact that I had been / was very ill. It is no surprise therefore after a few weeks of going to the gym every day, socialising with friends and finally towards the end returning to work that I began to see some of my progress slip away from me. I am still a million times better than I was even 3 months ago but I am not as well as I was a month ago.

My husband said he feels like it is back at the very early stages of my illness where I had no clue how to handle it. Where I was still blindly believing that I could exercise myself to good health, that staying out with friends for too long was okay because being social was more important.

This time however it took us both some time to realise that I was messing up. How could I be getting it so wrong when for so many months I had so carefully and so effectively managed my illness? How was it possible that the lessons I had learnt from that time could be forgotten so easily?

The answer is painful but relatively easy. I allowed myself to believe nay told myself I was no longer ill. While I still believe it is likely that I am no longer ill, I now realise that the process of recuperation doesn’t happen over night. The person who is declared cancer free is not one day ill and the next day totally fine. The person who is declared cancer free has many months of recuperation in front of them. With no one to direct me however I didn’t even consider this reality. I felt fine so surely that meant I was fine!

It is now I think about all those naysayers who read my blog and then warned me that by increasing my activity level I was inevitably going to make myself bedbound for life. That trying to do more was simply wrong. I think about them now not because I totally agree with them but rather if I soften their warnings a little – they are right. I have no doubt that unless I continue to carefully manage what I do, I will end up continuing to go backwards until I eventually reach the level I was six months ago or god forbid worse. Exercise and activity is not bad – in fact it is crucial to my continuing health. Unbridled expectations however are exceedingly dangerous, far too dangerous to dare go near.

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Once again I wish there was this magic person who could look at my life – how much work I have to do, how much exercise I want to do, how much socialising I want to do and how much down time I need and help me pace myself. However, given this person didn’t exist when I was desperately ill and floundering wildly, I very much doubt this person exists for me now. So I have put my husband, my family, my boss and all my friends on Karenwatch. Their job: spot when they think I am overdoing it and order me (not advise me) to stop, reduce what I am doing – think about it a bit more.